Keeping strong in mind and body

So here we are. Our lives have been completed disrupted by Coronavirus.  We are experiencing unprecedented times and having to adjust to a new way of living where we work from home (if we can), we can’t physically see or hug our family when we want to and, if we can go outside,  we must try to avoid people, and if we encounter them we swiftly move into an appropriate ‘social distance’.  On top of this, we have no way of knowing how long this will continue.

Our need for information can overwhelm our minds in a constant and ever-changing dialogue about pandemic, disaster, isolation and risk.  We respond in various ways, from denial, to panic, anxiety and helplessness with these feelings changing throughout the day.

I’ll be honest, this isn’t easy for me.  I lost my mum, sister, dad, aunt and granddad to pneumonia. My mum was 50 and healthy, my sister was 49 and had MS.  My husband has a pre-existing health condition – so to put it frankly Covid-19 scares the …. out of me and I recognise the feelings of anxiety and panic.

However, I wind back. This time 2 years ago, I was just about to find out that the symptoms I had been experiencing for months were due to spinal cord damage –  basically I had a huge calcified prolapse disc sticking in my spinal cord, which would eventually, if not treated, leave me paralysed from the waist down.  However, the surgery I had to urgently undergo was risky, carried a 2% chance of paralysis and only a 30% chance of improvement. It also carried a risk of pneumonia as they had to deflate one lung.  The bottom dropped out of my world.  All my plans and dreams were put on hold.  I was so scared!

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Knees, ankles, feet and toes

Bridge to fitness word cloudI’ve just returned from a thoroughly enjoyable and interesting and weekend seminar learning about treatment of knee and foot dysfunction and the connection between the foot, knee, ankle and the hip.   

The course was delivered by Dr Evan Osar who is a chiropractor (all the way from Chicago) and expert in assessment and corrective exercise to stabilise how individuals move to solve chronic postural and movement dysfunction.

Over the weekend the seminar covered the functional anatomy of the knee and ankle-foot complex, how poor stabilisation and biomechanics can lead to degeneration in joints such as the knees and hips and other conditions such as plantar fasciitis. Also, how exercises commonly given to ‘improve’ stability are more likely to reinforce bad habits, thereby leading to further injury; if these are carried out incorrectly without making sure correct alignment, foot function and breathing are addressed first. Read More »